Research

LANGUAGE CONTACT IN PANAMA:

My interests include language contact from a variationist perspective in the West Indian speech community in Panama City, Republic of Panama. This community is made up of descendants of Afro-Caribbeans who arrived in Panama from the English-speaking Caribbean islands. The majority were from Jamaica and Barbados, but there was also immigration from other islands where English was spoken. These immigrants worked on the most important projects in Panama, the construction of the first railroad and the first and second phases of the construction of the Panama Canal. Many maintained their Caribbean culture, which includes the music, the food, and of course, the language.

In the field of Linguistics, the variety of English spoken in Panama is known as Creole English, or more specifically, Panamanian Creole English. This variety continues to be spoken today in the West Indian speech community, but because of contact with Spanish, there has been noticeable influences from one language to another in the speech of bilingual afroantillanos, thus providing linguists with a community in which potential effects of contact can be explored. I focus particularly on acoustic phonetics in order to give an account of the changes that are occurring in Creole English and Spanish.

OTHER RESEARCH INTERESTS:

Phonology, phonetics, acoustic phonetics, sociophonetics, usage-based models of phonology,  grammaticalization, morphosyntax, sociolinguistic methods, Spanish dialectology, history of the Spanish language, Spanish in the U.S., language contact, bilingualism, and L2 acquisition of Spanish phonology

DISSERTATION:

My doctoral dissertation is entitled ‘A Variationist Account of Voice Onset Time among Bilingual West Indians in Panama’. This project is a sociophonetic study in which I examine the speech of Spanish-Creole English bilinguals living in Panama in order to ascertain the linguistic and social factors that have brought about change taking place in this speech community. Furthermore, I propose a Variationist Speech Learning Model (VSLM), which is based on the well-known Speech Learning Model (SLM) developed by Jim Flege. In the VSLM, a more detailed analysis of possible cross-language assimilation and dissimilation in bilingual speech is carried out by way of the Comparative Variationist Method developed by Shana Poplack and her colleagues.

RESEARCH PROJECTS:

“The development of consonant clusters in Spanish by native speakers of English” (with Sara Zahler and Danielle Daidone)

“Advanced S-Lenition and Interlingual Exemplar Connections”

“Explaining trill reduction within a usage-based framework”

“A comparative acoustic analysis of rhotics in monolinguals and bilinguals in Panama”

“Effects of contact on lateral production in the bilingual West Indian speech community of Panama”

PUBLICATIONS:

Lamy, D.S. (under revision). “A variationist account of voice onset time (VOT) among bilingual West Indians in Panama.” Submitted to Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Linguistics. (manuscript)

Lamy, D.S. (in press). “The individual as the locus of variation and change in a contact situation in Panama.” In Melvin Gonzalez-Rivera & Sandro Sessarego (eds.), New Perspectives on Hispanic Contact Linguistics in the Americas, Madrid: Iberoamericana Vervuert. (manuscript)

Lamy, D.S. (2015). “A sociophonetic analysis of trill production in Panamanian Spanish.” In Rachel Klassen, Juana Liceras & Elena Valenzuela (eds), Hispanic Linguistics at the crossroads: Theoretical linguistics, language acquisition and language contact, pp. 313-336. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.(manuscript)

INVITED TALKS AND WORKSHOPS:

Lamy, D.S. (2014). Guest Lecture on “Sociofonética: Metodología e implicaciones teórica. Department of Modern Languages and Literatures at the University of Ottawa, September, 30, 2014.

Lamy, D.S. & Cabrelli-Amaro, J. (2012). PRAAT Workshop Series. Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies at the University of Florida, April 3 & 10, 2012.

Lamy, D.S., Zahler, S., & Fionda, M. (2012). Invited Open Forum on “Variation and functionalism: theory, methodology, and SLA.” 7th Annual Interdisciplinary Colloquium on Spanish, Portuguese and Catalan Linguistics, Literature, and Cultures held at the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, February, 2012.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS:

Honea, K. & Lamy, D.S. (2014). “Ocupo que no ocupen el verbo ocupar cuando quieren decir necesitar.” Presented at the Hispanic Linguistic Symposium 2014 (HLS2014) held at Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, November 13-16, 2014.

Lamy, D.S. (2014). “A usage-based analysis of trill production in Panama City Spanish.” Presented at the Hispanic Linguistic Symposium 2014 (HLS2014) held at Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, November 13-16, 2014.

Honea, K. & Lamy, D.S. (2014). “Ocupo, quiero, necesito ir al cine: A shift in deontic modals in Mexican Spanish.” Presented at The 43rd New Ways of Analyzing Variation conference (NWAV43) held at the University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, October 23-26, 2014.

Lamy, D.S. (2014). “Explaining trill production within a usage-based framework: The case of Panama City Spanish.” Presented at The 43rd New Ways of Analyzing Variation conference (NWAV43) held at the University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, October 23-26, 2014.

Lamy, D.S. (2014). “Continuous or discrete variables? An acoustic analysis of variable rhotic production in Panama”. 7th International Workshop on Spanish Sociolinguistics (WSS7) held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, April 3-5, 2014.

Lamy, D.S. (2013). “A sociophonetic analysis of trill production in Panamanian Spanish.” Hispanic Linguistic Symposium 2013 (HLS 2013) held at the University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, October 17-20, 2013.

Lamy, D.S. (2013). “Effects of contact on lateral production among bilingual West Indians in Panama.” The 66th Annual KFLC: The Languages, Literatures, and Cultures Conference held at University of Kentucky, Lexington Kentucky, April 18 – 20, 2013.

Lamy, D.S. (2012). “F2 variation in lateral production in bilingual West Indian speech of Panama.” Hispanic Linguistic Symposium 2012 (HLS 2012) held at the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, October 25-28, 2012.

Lamy, D.S. (2012). “An account of sound change in a contact situation: Bilingual Speech in Panama.” 65th Annual Kentucky Foreign Language Conference held at University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, April 19 – 21, 2012.

Lamy, D.S. (2012). “The voiceless dental /t/ in Bilingual West Indian speech: Language contact in Panama City.” Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics 2012 (GURT 2012) held at Georgetown University, Washington D.C., March 8 – 11, 2012.

Lamy, D.S. (2012). “An acoustic analysis of Spanish and Creole English in contact.” 7th Annual Interdisciplinary Colloquium on Spanish, Portuguese and Catalan Linguistics, Literature, and Cultures held at the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, February, 2012.

Lamy, D.S. (2012). “A variationist approach to the Speech Learning Model: Bilingual voice onset time in Panama.” Current Approaches to Spanish and Portuguese Second Language Phonology  (CASPSLaP 2012) held at the University of South Carolina, Columbus, South Carolina, February 16 – 19, 2012.

Lamy, D.S. (2012). “The Dental Plosive in a contact situation: Creole English and Spanish in Panama City.” The Society of Pidgin and Creole Linguistics held at the 86th Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America (LSA), Portland, Oregon, January 4 – 6, 2012.

Lamy, D.S. (2011). “A comparative account of sound production among bilingual West Indians in Panama City. 7th Annual Meeting of Conference of the Social Sciences 2011: “Crossing Boundaries”,  University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, October, 2o11.

Lamy, D.S. (2011). “A variationist account of the voiceless dental in a contact situation: Spanish and creole English in Panama City.” Summer School of Sociolinguistics 3, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, UK, July, 2011.

Lamy, D.S. (2010). “Marcador epistémico y discursivo: ‘dizque’ en el español panameño”. 5th International Workshop on Spanish Sociolinguistics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, April, 2010

Click here to listen to an interview that I was invited to participate in concerning the role of language in economic behavior.